Interdisciplinary Workshops on Politics and Policy

About the workshops

Interdisciplinary Workshops on Politics and Policy are weekly seminars hosted by the Center for Political Studies. Speakers present current research on a wide range of topics. Abstracts of past workshops are available in the menu to the right.

Interdisciplinary Workshops on Politics and Policy will be hosted via Zoom through the end of 2021. Please see below for additional details.

 

2021-2022 Events

Trust in Religious Leaders & Voluntary Compliance: Lessons from Social Distancing during COVID-19 in Central Asia

October 20, 2021 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Pauline Jones (University of Michigan)
Join via Zoom: https://umich.zoom.us/j/92005095888
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Abstract
What is the relationship between trust in religious leaders and voluntary compliance with policies that are costly to the individual? Religious leaders have the moral authority to affect individuals’ willingness to adopt pro-social behaviors across many societies. Less clear is whether that influence will be positive or negative. It cannot be assumed ex ante that religious leaders will uniformly support social distancing guidelines both because they may be reluctant to discourage congregants from attending services and because their leadership within a country is often decentralized. We investigate how trust in religious leaders affects compliance in countries where religious authority is centralized and state aligned. We argue that, under these conditions, greater trust in religious leaders will be associated with more voluntary compliance, but that this effect will be limited to religious celebrations and rituals. Using novel data from surveys fielded in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan during the COVID-19 pandemic, we find support for both hypotheses but only in Kazakhstan, where religious leaders consistently offered adherents substitutes that enabled them to practice their faith while social distancing. The influence of religious leaders on voluntary compliance, therefore, may depend as much on the content of the message as it does on the source.

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

October 27, 2021 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Wendy Pearlman (Northwestern University)
Join via Zoom: https://umich.zoom.us/j/91429736051
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Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

November 3, 2021 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Mai Hassan (Univ. of Michigan)
Join via Zoom: https://umich.zoom.us/j/93865988691
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Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

November 10, 2021 | Noon to 1:00 PM EST
Kenny Lowande (Univ. of Michigan)
Join via Zoom: https://umich.zoom.us/j/99592649841
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Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

November 17, 2021 | Noon to 1:00 PM EST
Gwyneth McClendon (New York University)
Join via Zoom: https://umich.zoom.us/j/97856170957
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Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

January 12, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EST
Shea Streeter (Univ. of Michigan)

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

February 9, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EST
Angela Ocampo (Univ. of Michigan)

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

February 23, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EST
Edgar Franco Vivanco (Univ. of Michigan)

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

March 9, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EST
Michael Minta (Univ. of Minnesota)

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

April 13, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Joshua Kertzer (Harvard University)

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

April 20, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Scott Abramson (Univ. of Rochester)

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

April 27, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Guy Grossman (Univ. of Pennsylvania)

Interdisciplinary Workshop on Politics and Policy

May 4, 2022 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Iza Ding (University of Pittsburgh)

Past Events

Gender, Social Recognition, and Political Influence

October 6, 2021 | Noon to 1:00 PM EDT
Cesi Cruz (UCLA)
Join via Zoom: https://umich.zoom.us/j/91971833625
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Abstract

What determines women’s political influence? While the literature on political engagement focuses on individual traits, attitudes, and participation, we argue that how these factors translate to political influence is fundamentally a social process that requires recognition from the broader community, with important implications for understanding women’s political engagement. Using new data on networks of political influence in Philippine villages, we show that even after controlling for socioeconomic status or political participation, women are still markedly less likely to be recognized as influential. Furthermore, we show that engagement in politics through traditional means–running for office, participating in councils, or joining parties–are only associated with political influence for men. The determinants of influence are more complex for women: embeddedness in the community and participation in community activities are more important than traditional modes of political participation.